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“Thank you so much for your unbelievable help with this. It was done in a cordial way as my late mum said it should be.”

PAUL ASHWELL
WILLS, PROBATE & INHERITANCE

"Lauren presented his idea with such clarity and logic, the Court totally agreed with him and paved the way to my costs recovery.
This would not have happened without the amount of skill and effort that Lauren applied to this case."

LAUREN GODFREY
CONTRACTS & DEBT RECOVERY

"Please accept our thanks and gratitude of your handling of this case and especially Charlotte’s mitigation in court, which really got the desired outcome"

Charlotte Morrish
MOTORING OFFENCES

Latest News

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Family legal terms explained: Matrimonial

The legal jargon involved in divorce and financial proceedings can be difficult...

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Criminal proceedings part two: Will my case go to the Magistrates’ Court or Crown Court?

In the second part of our series on criminal proceedings, we examine the...

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Criminal proceedings part one: The Court system

Criminal law proceedings can be complex and it is sometimes difficult to know...

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Family legal terms explained: Children

Family proceedings can be stressful and as well as learning to navigate the...

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public-access

What is Public Access?

In July 2004 the Public Access Scheme came into force, which allowed members of the public as well as organisations to instruct a Barrister directly on most legal matters. In the past, it would have been necessary to instruct a Solicitor who would then appoint a Barrister on your behalf. The question you can now ask yourself is “Should I contact a Solicitor or Barrister?”

This allows you to benefit from the savings in time and costs that can come from going direct rather than through an intermediary. Now anyone – individuals, companies, firms etc can instruct a Barrister directly.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION>
(from the Bar Council, which introduced the Direct Access Scheme).